Tuesday, October 26, 2010

What's in a Name ? 3 Challenge

What's in a Name? 3 Challenge
January 1 - December 3, 2010

Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, I will read one book in each of the following categories:
  1. A book with a food in the title: Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris -- finished 3/6/2010
  2. A book with a body of water in the title: Cane River by Lalita Tademy -- finished 10/25/2010
  3. A book with a title (queen, president) in the title: The Winter Queen by Boris Akunin -- finished 2/26/2010
  4. A book with a plant in the title: The Wood Wife by Terri Windling -- finished 3/2/2010
  5. A book with a place name (city, country) in the title: The Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad -- finished 2/16/2010
  6. A book with a music term in the title: The Mapmaker's Opera by Béa Gonzalez -- finished 1/17/2010

Cane River by Lalilta Tademy

First sentence:

"On the morning of her ninth birthday, the day after Madame Francoise Derbanne slapped her, Suzette peed on the rosebushes."


"Ladita Tademy had always been intensely interested in her family's stories, especially ones about her great-grandmother Emily, a formidable figure who died with her life's savings hidden in her mattress. Probing deeper for her family's roots, Tademy soon found herself swept up in an obsessive two-year odyssey--and leaving her corporate career for the little Louisiana farming community of...Cane River. It was here, on a medium-sized Creole plantation owned by a family named Derbanne, that author Lalita Tademy found her family's roots--and the stories of four astonishing women whose lives began in slavery, who weathered the Civil War, and who grappled with the contradictions of emancipation through the turbulent early years of the twentieth century. Through it all, they fought to unite their family and forge success on their own terms.

Here amid small farmhouses and a tightly knit community of French-speaking slaves, free people of color, and whites, Tademy's great-great-great-great-grandmother Elisabeth would bear both a proud heritage and the yoke of slavery. Her youngest daughter, Suzette, would be the first to discover the promise--and heartbreak--of freedom. Suzette's strong-willed daughter Philomene would use determination born of tragedy to reunite her family and gain unheard of economic independence. And Emily, Philomene's spirited daughter, would fight to secure her children's just due and preserve their future against dangerous odds.

In a novel that combines painstaking historical reconstruction with unforgettable storytelling, Lalita Tademy presents an all too rarely seen part of American history, complete with a provocative portrayal of the complex, unspoken bonds between slaves and slave owners.Most of all, she gives us the saga of real, flesh-and-blood women, making hard choices in the face of unimaginable loss, securing their identity and independence in order to face any obstacle, and inspiring all the generations to come.' -- from the inside flap

My thoughts:

I liked this book about Tademy's ancestors and their struggles in the 19th and early 20th century. I especially liked the way she inserted images of newspaper accounts, slave auction lists, and census records. I would read these documents just after reading the fictional account and would connect the names to the characters, making them more "alive." I look forward to reading the sequel, Red River.

Date read: 10/25/2010
Book #: 48
Challenge: What's in a Name? 3 Challenge
Series: Tademy Family Chronicles, #1
Rating: 4*/5 = great
Genre: Historical Fiction

ISBN-10: 0446530522
ISBN-13: 978044653952?
Publisher: Warner Books
Year: 2001
# of pages: 416
Binding: Hardcover
LibraryThing page